Cover image for The Manhattan projects. Vol. 2, Science. Bad. / Jonathan Hickman, writer ; Nick Pitarra, artist ; Jordie Bellaire, colors ; Rus Wooton, letters ; with Ryan Browne, artist.
Title:
The Manhattan projects. Vol. 2, Science. Bad. / Jonathan Hickman, writer ; Nick Pitarra, artist ; Jordie Bellaire, colors ; Rus Wooton, letters ; with Ryan Browne, artist.
Title Variants:
Science. Bad
ISBN:
9781607067269
Publication Information:
Berkeley, CA : Image Comics, c2013.
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : chiefly ill. (chiefly col.) ; 26 cm.
General Note:
"Originally published in single magazine form as The Manhattan Projects #6-10"--Adjacent p. to t.p.
Abstract:
The eccentric scientists of the Manhattan Project, using the building of the atomic bomb as a front, engage in unusual and sinister experiments that could affect the future of the world.
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Summary

Summary

The second amazing volume of the Science, Bad book of the newmillennium. The battle for global supremacy is underway and the bad men of theManhattan Projects will only accept one outcome: World domination!


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

A psychopathic Oppenheimer, a narcissistic Feynman, a cybog von Braun, and an imprisoned Einstein who's obsessed with a monolith: this is decidedly not your grandfather's Manhattan Project. With artificial intelligence, first contact, and interdimensional travel on the agenda-plus Japanese Death Buddhists to deal with-this group, led by the hard-nosed, hands-on, gung-ho Gen. Leslie Groves, clearly has more on its mind than the delivery of a couple of bombs (though in one particularly chilling episode, they do take care of that little detail). -VERDICT Hickman combines the secret society historical revisionism of his work on Marvel's S.H.I.E.L.D. with the affinity for big science he shows in his excellent Harvey Award-nominated Fantastic Four (LJ 9/15/11). But the tone here is more grotesque and outrageous, qualities well matched by Pitarra's artwork and its garish coloring. The result is something like an uneasy meeting of Warren Ellis's Planetary with Layman and Guillory's Chew-wide-scope cosmic invention in a context of horror, gore, and black comedy. Not as successful or essential as Hickman's aforementioned Marvel work, but interesting.-S.R. (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.