Cover image for They called me number one : secrets and survival at an Indian residential school / Bev Sellars ; [foreword by Hemas Kla-Lee-Lee-Kla (Bill Wilson) ; afterword by Wendy Wickwire]
Title:
They called me number one : secrets and survival at an Indian residential school / Bev Sellars ; [foreword by Hemas Kla-Lee-Lee-Kla (Bill Wilson) ; afterword by Wendy Wickwire]
Title Variants:
They called me number 1

They called me no. 1

They called me no. one
ISBN:
9780889227415
Publication Information:
Vancouver : Talonbooks, 2013.
Physical Description:
xvi, 227 p. ; ill., maps, ports. ; 22 cm.
Holds:
Copies:

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1 Bob Harkins Branch 371.82997943 SEL Book Adult General Collection
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2 Bob Harkins Branch 371.82997943 SEL Book Adult General Collection
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3 Bob Harkins Branch 371.82997943 SEL Book Adult General Collection
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4 Bob Harkins Branch 371.82997943 SEL Book Adult General Collection
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6 Bob Harkins Branch 371.82997943 SEL Book Adult General Collection
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7 Bob Harkins Branch 371.82997943 SEL Book Adult General Collection
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Summary

Summary

BC Book Prize, Non-Fiction, Bev Sellars, They Called Me Number One (Finalist)
Burt Award for First Nations, M#65533;tis, and Inuit Literature: Bev Sellars, They Called Me Number One (Third Prize winner)

Like thousands of Aboriginal children in Canada, and elsewhere in the colonized world, Xatsu'll chief Bev Sellars spent part of her childhood as a student in a church-run residential school.

These institutions endeavored to "civilize" Native children through Christian teachings; forced separation from family, language, and culture; and strict discipline. Perhaps the most symbolically potent strategy used to alienate residential school children was addressing them by assigned numbers only--not by the names with which they knew and understood themselves.

In this frank and poignant memoir of her years at St. Joseph's Mission, Sellars breaks her silence about the residential school's lasting effects on her and her family--from substance abuse to suicide attempts--and eloquently articulates her own path to healing. Number One comes at a time of recognition--by governments and society at large--that only through knowing the truth about these past injustices can we begin to redress them.


Author Notes

Bev Sellars was chief of the Xat'sull (Soda Creek) First Nation in Williams Lake, British Columbia, for more than 20 years, and she now serves as a member of its Council. Sellars returned to the First Nations community of Soda Creek after an extended period of "visiting other territories." While she was away, she earned a degree in history from the University of Victoria and a law degree from the University of British Columbia, and she served as adviser for the B.C. Treaty Commission. She was first elected chief in 1987 and has spoken out on behalf of her community on racism and residential schools and on the environmental and social threats of mineral resource exploitation in her region.


Table of Contents

Hemas Kla-Lee-Lee-Ma and Chief Bill WilsonWendy Wickwire
Forewordp. ix
Preface: What Pain Have You Suffered?p. xiii
Acknowledgementsp. xix
Illustrations
Map of First Nations Attending St. Joseph's Missionp. xxiii
Six Generationsp. xxv
Chapter 1 My Grandmother and Others Before Mep. 3
Chapter 2 Sardis Hospital = Lonelinessp. 23
Chapter 3 St. Joseph's Mission = Prisonp. 29
Chapter 4 I Get Religion But What Did It Mean?p. 43
Chapter 5 The Body Was No Templep. 57
Chapter 6 A Few Good Memoriesp. 73
Chapter 7 Pain, Bullying, But Also Pleasurep. 85
Chapter 8 Home Sweet Homep. 101
Chapter 9 Summer of '67p. 115
Chapter 10 Life on the Reservep. 133
Chapter 11 One Day I Realized I Had Survivedp. 145
Chapter 12 Becoming a Leaderp. 163
Chapter 13 Going to Universityp. 179
Chapter 14 Final Thoughtsp. 189
Afterwordp. 193
Notesp. 201
Indexp. 215

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